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Kindergarten: where young scientists are born
12 Sep, 2015. 2 Comments. A Day In First Grade, Autumn, Kindergarten, Kindergarten Science, Preschool Science. Posted By: Kristen Smith

This week we began the journey on a four – six week inquiry.  I’m excited and my students are even more excited. Basically, we are gearing up to study forests and leaves. However,  I wanted my students to truly understand how connected everything is in the world. To do this, we started our inquiry with worms and soil.

We read the book “Garden Wigglers” and created an anchor chart of everything we knew about worms.

I then brought out the worms that I had purchased from a local bait shop and let my students explore them carefully. They were very interested in figuring out where the worm’s mouths were. They were taken aback when they learned that worms do not have eyes or noses. :)

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We then worked together to create a few worm hotels. This was so much fun for my students and I loved the observations and discoveries they made throughout the process.

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“The sand is like the sand I played in at the beach this summer!”

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“This soil looks like the dirt in my garden.”

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“We are making a pattern! Sand, soil, sand, soil!”

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“We need to make sure we make each layer level. Let’s turn it around to make sure it is!”

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After we had a few layers added to our worm habitat, some of my brave students added the worms to their new temporary homes.

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“The worm is so slimy!!!”

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We also went out to our school’s garden to observe a worm’s natural habitat. My young scientists carefully drew what they saw in the garden and made some amazing observations and discoveries.

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This little girl found a “burrow” and all of my students came running over to investigate her discovery.

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My students carefully investigated, discussed, and documented what they noticed.

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They loved spending time outside and gathered great data!

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The next day, my students noticed that the worms worked hard during the night and found a bunch of burrows.

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It was neat to hear their conversations incorporating so many of our new science terms.

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Friday afternoon we ventured back out to the garden to release our worms into our garden beds. My students said their good-byes and wished the worms well. They asked the worms to do a good job preparing our soil for the seeds we will be planting soon! :)

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Next week we will be ready to learn about the forest and the animals that live there.

I hope that you had a great week!

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2 Comments
  1. Jill -

    I’m always so impressed when teachers create true inquiry units for their students! I’m in my second year of teaching and I really want to do at least one inquiry unit this year but I don’t know where to start! Are there any resources you recommend I look into as I begin my planning? What does your schedule look like? When/how do you incorporate your school’s curriculum, phonics, and the like? I want to do something with animals in the spring so I have plenty of time to play around with it. I realize the three questions I asked could fill three separate books but any help would be appreciated!

  2. It looks like they had a great time discovering worms first hand. Isn’t it fun to listen to the things they say when they are exploring independently? We always have a purpose for what we do, but it never ceases to amaze me the purposes they find too!

    Amanda
    A Very Curious Class

2 Comments

  • Jill -

    I’m always so impressed when teachers create true inquiry units for their students! I’m in my second year of teaching and I really want to do at least one inquiry unit this year but I don’t know where to start! Are there any resources you recommend I look into as I begin my planning? What does your schedule look like? When/how do you incorporate your school’s curriculum, phonics, and the like? I want to do something with animals in the spring so I have plenty of time to play around with it. I realize the three questions I asked could fill three separate books but any help would be appreciated!

  • It looks like they had a great time discovering worms first hand. Isn’t it fun to listen to the things they say when they are exploring independently? We always have a purpose for what we do, but it never ceases to amaze me the purposes they find too!

    Amanda
    A Very Curious Class

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