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Exploring Sound With Kindergarteners
Exploring Sound With Kindergarteners
30 Jan, 2016. 2 Comments. A Day In First Grade, Kindergarten, Kindergarten Science, Preschool Science. Posted By: Kristen Smith

Exploring Sound With Kindergarteners

We just finished a unit exploring light and sound. If you would like to read about the light inquiry, you can do so here. Today, I wanted to share with you some of the fun activities that we completed to help us understand sound!

When my students walked into the classroom the first day of our unit, I had set up a counter of instruments for my students to explore. (I asked my parents and our music teacher a few weeks in advance if they had any instruments that we could borrow!) We ended up getting a TON of really fun instruments: African drums, percussion frogs, maracas, recorders, singing bowls, a glockenspiel, and more! These definitely peaked their interests!

Then, we read the book, “Sounds All Around.”

Screen Shot 2016-01-25 at 6.37.51 AM

http://amzn.to/1RIqse6 (affiliate link)

This was the perfect book to captivate my students’ interests and to teach us a few new vocabulary words.

That afternoon, my students happily explored the instruments trying to figure out how they were making sounds!

Exploring sound with young learners Exploring sound with young learners

The next day we dug a little deeper into the unit and created a few instruments. One of my students had discovered during our light inquiry that our rainbow spectrum also made sound. We worked together to turn it into a water xylophone. My students practiced making songs with it!

Exploring sound with young learners

We also created straw kazoos! This activity was beyond hysterical. I wish I took a video to show y’all because the kids had a BLAST doing this. For the activity you simply need a straw for every child and scissors.

Have your students bite down on the end of the straw and cut it so the end makes a v. (This creates a reed.)

Making straw kazoos in kindergarten

Then have them blow into their straws.

Exploring sound with young learners

It creates a sound that is so very funny. My students were beyond excited to make songs and music with these instruments.

Exploring sound with young learners

Once they got the hang of it, they experimented with cutting the straw shorter, which changed the pitch of the sound! They loved this!!

The next day we watched part of a video on youtube that taught us about the different types of instruments in an orchestra.

Afterwards, we talked about the different ways that you can play instruments and labeled our tables with words such as “shake,” “blow,” “strum,” “strike,” etc. My students then had to work together to sort all of our classroom instruments.

Exploring sound with young learners

That afternoon we also worked on body control using sound. I played the song “Across The Bridge” by Greg and Steve and set up a balance beam around my classroom carpet. I used our classroom blocks to do this and challenged my students to walk around the bridge without falling. This was a HUGE hit!

A Day In First Grade-51 A Day In First Grade-56

Finally, no unit on sound would be complete without creating a classroom band and having a dance party. :) We had a blast exploring sound! I hope that you can incorporate some of these activities into your classroom!

If you would like the written out lesson plans, activities, and printables, I created a pack entitled “Light and Sound” which is available in my Teachers Pay Teachers Store or here on my blog!  Click HERE to get it!

Sound and Light

Enjoy! :)

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2 Comments
  1. I really appreciate your emails that explain the order you use for implementing your units in the classroom. While we all have different time constraints and curriculums it helps to see how a teacher actually uses the unit in her classroom and in which order.

    My question is do you have a general plan about when, what time of year you are doing each unit? I know that we all have a scope and sequence determined by our district, board, or whomever runs our schools but I have just found your units and am scrambling to integrate them into my curriculum.

    A general run down say from February thru June would help me know which units are available and maybe I can buy and orep them and not be scrambling every weekend. Not your fault, but mine. I can’t not do each unit I find. Lol. For example, I found your nocturnal unit and even though it isn’t fall I am working it into our animal/mammal unit that we are studying right now.

    I’ve purchased other products that were good, but yours consistently are better. And then when you include an email explaining the order it makes it very easy for me to make a list of what I already have or need to get and then work it into my current lessons.

    Thank you for taking the time to create these learning units and the follow up emails that explain even further!

    Laura

  2. This looks great! I will be collaborating with the grade 1 teacher at my school on his science lessons on sound and would like to incorporate some of your ideas. I’m also going to see about getting the book you recommended for our library. Thanks!

2 Comments

  • I really appreciate your emails that explain the order you use for implementing your units in the classroom. While we all have different time constraints and curriculums it helps to see how a teacher actually uses the unit in her classroom and in which order.

    My question is do you have a general plan about when, what time of year you are doing each unit? I know that we all have a scope and sequence determined by our district, board, or whomever runs our schools but I have just found your units and am scrambling to integrate them into my curriculum.

    A general run down say from February thru June would help me know which units are available and maybe I can buy and orep them and not be scrambling every weekend. Not your fault, but mine. I can’t not do each unit I find. Lol. For example, I found your nocturnal unit and even though it isn’t fall I am working it into our animal/mammal unit that we are studying right now.

    I’ve purchased other products that were good, but yours consistently are better. And then when you include an email explaining the order it makes it very easy for me to make a list of what I already have or need to get and then work it into my current lessons.

    Thank you for taking the time to create these learning units and the follow up emails that explain even further!

    Laura

  • This looks great! I will be collaborating with the grade 1 teacher at my school on his science lessons on sound and would like to incorporate some of your ideas. I’m also going to see about getting the book you recommended for our library. Thanks!

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